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#1 2017-09-05 23:45:02

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Possible site administrator outage

Yes, I know that sounds weird.

Anyone living in the US and NOT under a rock has heard about Hurricane Irma.  185mph winds and massive.  It is projected that it may hit Florida early next week.

I live in Florida.

While the site should be in no danger itself, it is possible that I will be either:
a) without power, or
b) in another state.

It is also possible that
c) the storm won't come here, and this is all moot.

In any case, if you're trying to get a hold of me between, say, Saturday, and oh... the apocalypse... and I'm not answering, that would most likely be why.  We will absolutely not stick around for anything Cat 3 or higher.  Cat 2, we'll play by ear.  Cat 1, we will (probably) shelter in place.  Tropical Storms, we won't even notice.

Eric Storm


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#2 2017-09-06 00:11:33

Barbarian3165
Wasted
Registered: 2015-02-11
Posts: 242

Re: Possible site administrator outage

take care of yourself and your family... we will survive, pitifully, but we will survive.

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#3 2017-09-06 01:11:38

Jefferson
Completely Blotto
From: East Coast, USA
Registered: 2006-12-03
Posts: 402

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Get out quick, dude. Sounds like Irma is trying to destroy that state. The entire state is going to be running away. Get out early!!!

Good luck.


Women have boyfriends and girlfriends. If you’re not fucking her, you’re her girlfriend.

-  Rollo Tomassi.
Author of "The Rational Male."

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#4 2017-09-06 06:58:06

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Re: Possible site administrator outage

And if it goes somewhere else entirely?

Running before you know where to run away from is a good way to die.  There is, as yet, no indication where Irma is going to hit.  Some of the spaghetti models suggest it could miss the state entirely, out into the Atlantic, and in that case, we'd get nothing more than a bit of wind and some heavy rain.  And one of those models has it going to the west of us and hitting the Florida panhandle.  If it goes that way, depending on where we were, we could have blundered right into its path.  And evacuation is not as simple as just hopping in the van and going.  We have 8 animals to move out.  Yes, we are preparing for the contingency, but I'm not going to run until I know I'm supposed to.

I have ordered wire crates for the cats, which will be here Friday.  I have scheduled a vet visit for two of the cats for Thursday, because one of them has an expiring rabies vaccine in the middle of this month, and I don't want to be taking it across state lines without the proper vaccinations.  We'll be getting the van filled up with gas Wednesday afternoon.  We are also putting together a water supply and buying some canned goods, in case we need to deal with a power outage after sheltering in place.  Trust me, this is a standard routine for Floridians.  Category 3 or Category 5 really makes no difference: in either case, you find out if it's gonna hit you, and then you get the fuck out of its way.  But you do need to wait to see if it's going to hit you.  Otherwise, you're endangering the lives of people who actually are in its path by slowing down THEIR evacuation.

But no, I'm not going to wait until 12 hours before the thing's going to hit before leaving, either.  As soon as I'm reasonably sure we're going to get major storm conditions, we'll be heading out.

Eric Storm


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#5 2017-09-06 18:13:01

Barbarian3165
Wasted
Registered: 2015-02-11
Posts: 242

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Good luck and take care.  Don't worry about us or the website until it's all over.

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#6 2017-09-07 05:11:46

Fenixreign
Completely Blotto
Registered: 2014-08-02
Posts: 255

Re: Possible site administrator outage

You COULD take a trip to Oregon or Michigan.  I bet Irma doesn't hit there!

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#7 2017-09-07 07:08:10

fathertyme
Inebriated
From: Second star to the right
Registered: 2009-02-18
Posts: 84

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Isn't Oregon pretty much on fire right now?

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#8 2017-09-07 12:35:24

Fenixreign
Completely Blotto
Registered: 2014-08-02
Posts: 255

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Not sure, but regardless, it isn't Irma!

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#9 2017-09-07 14:59:20

Augur
Inebriated
Registered: 2012-08-23
Posts: 82

Re: Possible site administrator outage

What seems somewhat strange to me is people living in hurricane prone areas building flimsy houses. Of course concrete/brick walls, concrete roof, strong window panels, etc. is more expensive than the regular flimsy american house style walls (2-4 inches width. Even if that were concrete that´s incredibly thin, but most houses I have seen aren´t even concrete, but rather wood and plywood) with a flimsy roof on a wooden structure, etc, but with a sturdy house:
1. you wouldn´t have to evacuate as long as you don´t live in a low lying area,
2. you wouldn´t have to rebuild your home after every hurricane that passes through. I would see it as a kind of insurance, nor only for the house itself, but also its contents (all family photos, books, paintings, personal stuff) and particularly me and my family if having a sturdy house allows us to stay at home no matter the storm. 
3. The additional benefit of increased security against home invasion and such.

I understand right now when you mostly buy what is on the market, and the houses on the market are mostly the way they are. But hurricanes are nothing new in Florida. Why did people build them the way they did, instead of building something durable?

Last edited by Augur (2017-09-07 15:01:00)

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#10 2017-09-07 16:15:33

Barbarian3165
Wasted
Registered: 2015-02-11
Posts: 242

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Insurance and Charity are two possible reasons why things are built at a low cost.  It is probably cheaper to pay the insurance company fee and then submit your claim.  And if that doesn't work, you either rely on private charity or public charity (in the form of government handouts).  Six Billion dollars have already been requested for the Texas hurricane by President Trump, I'd imagine Florida will receive a request for similar federal funds to help the state out.

But to your point, some do build homes to stand up to hurricanes.  However, this is supposedly one of the biggest, if not the biggest hurricane in recorded history, at least for the Americas. Of course, I'm not counting typhoons.

Last edited by Barbarian3165 (2017-09-07 16:16:34)

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#11 2017-09-07 20:25:39

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Okay, let's clear up a few obvious misconceptions:

1. Water is what does most of the damage in a hurricane, not wind.  And not just the storm surge, but the flooding caused by rain.  Hurricane Harvey dropped 25 TRILLION gallons of water on Houston.  (That's 2.5 x 10^13, for you non-US "trillion" users...)

2. FLORIDA is a low-lying area.  The elevation of the city of Miami is 6 1/2 feet.  The elevation of Naples, FL, is only THREE feet.  The highest point in the entire state is a whopping 345' above sea level, and the mean elevation is 100'.  You can figure that the coastline in for about 20 miles is just a few feet above sea level.  If a strong hurricane hits your area, you ARE in a low-lying area, and need to get the hell out of the way.

3. There is nothing inherently wrong with stick-frame construction.  Rigidity is not usually the best defense against high winds.  You want proof?  The native tree in Florida is the PALM.  Its main feature?  It bends like crazy in high winds, and then bounces right back.  Similarly, stick-frame construction "gives" before it breaks.  If you actually want to improve hurricane resistance, look at the shape of the building, not what it's made of.  Flat walls act like sails for the wind to push against.  Round surfaces tend to survive winds better.  So why don't we make our buildings circular?  Because living inside a circular building is very inconvenient.

4. We have hurricane codes now, and any house built to them will stand up to most hurricanes.  And, oh yeah, even if your house is built of concrete, you're still going to have to attach a roof to it somehow.  The roof is the weakest point of all homes, because once that gets ripped off, the wind and rain destroy what's inside.  Hurricane clips can hold the roof down for longer, but even they have a failure point.  You built your house out of concrete, you say?  Well, when that 20' storm surge is done filling it, you'll have a very nice swimming pool... but it will NOT be usable as a house anymore.  No, you will NOT be able to just clean it out and put a roof back on.  If you've had several feet of water in your home for a couple weeks, chances are it would be CHEAPER to tear it down and rebuild, than to tear out all the walls, wiring, and plumbing, and then put all that stuff back in (and you will need to do that because it will all be unusable).  And since you're now tearing it down, those sturdy concrete walls ADD to your expense, because they take longer to demolish!

5. There is no construction at all that will allow you to stay home "no matter the storm".  You're forgetting the other problems that occur outside your home.  Like not having power for a couple of months, (you're gonna need a hell of a generator to keep things running for weeks...) or the 8' of water surrounding the building.  Even if your castle has held from the onslaught, do you plan on staying in it and starving to death?  The cleanup from a Cat 5 storm takes WEEKS and MONTHS.  Just ask New Orleans.  And now that you have sheltered in place and survived... you no longer have a way to safety, unless you happen to own a boat that isn't under water already, because your car isn't going to drive through that 8' of water.  And even if the water recedes and you could theoretically drive out... the chances that your car will actually still function are pretty slim... and the roads are going to be clogged with debris anyway... you, my friend, are now trapped.

6.  Florida Building Code currently requires newly built structures to stand up to most hurricanes.  The home I live in is 60 years old.  It is made of cinder block, with a wood roof.  In 1959, when it was built, they didn't know any better way to do it.  Hurricane clips had not yet been invented.  Nowadays, in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, many of the new homes are made of cinder block construction with concrete pillars, and trussed roofs tied in with hurricane clips.  In other words, you do the best you can.  But you can't build to a standard you don't know about, and 50-60 years ago, they didn't know how to make hurricane-proof houses that didn't cost a quarter million dollars.

7.  In the 70's, Florida faced a population explosion.  There was extreme pressure to build new homes quickly.  You can do it fast, or you can do it right.  You can't do it both.  The houses in South Florida back then were built... well, they were built illegally, quite frankly: they didn't even meet the building code of the time.  The officials looked the other way for the economic sake of the community.

8.  It's actually 8 billion dollars for Harvey, not 6, and Congress has approved it.

9.  The truth is, it actually is cheaper, in a lot of cases, to simply rebuild a cheap house than to build a super-strong house.

10.  The question you should be asking, if you're going to go down this line of thought at all, isn't, "why do people make homes too weak to stand up to hurricanes?"  The question should be, "Why do people live in a place that regularly gets leveled by serious storms?"  Most of Florida is prone to hurricanes, flooding, and sinkholes.  Why, pray tell, do we live here AT ALL???  Answer:  Because we're stupid.  3dsmile  Real answer:  Because there is a point where humans just accept the risk of certain things.  Why do people live near volcanoes?  Hell, people in Hawaii regularly lose their homes to lava flows... yet they still live there... 

11. If Irma follows the current predicted track, they're gonna need a lot more than $8 billion.  It's slated to walk its way right up the eastern Florida coastline.  That means Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, Boca Raton, Port St. Lucie, Cape Canaveral, Daytona Beach, St. Augustine, Jacksonville, and a lot of other places are going to get nailed.  And then it's supposed to slam right into Savannah, GA.  This one could cost us a LOT. 

Eric Storm

PS:  No, I don't care if my last name offends someone right now.


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#12 2017-09-08 00:07:52

Augur
Inebriated
Registered: 2012-08-23
Posts: 82

Re: Possible site administrator outage

1. That amount doesn't tell a thing, because it's not clear over what area, etc. A more interesting data point would be how many millimeters of water may you expect on average in Florida. Also copious rain doesn't scare me as much, as I live in a location with around 5000 mm. of precipitations per year. We actually regularly get some musonic rainstorms that are quite probably on the same precipitation level as what you get in a hurricane, if not more. For perspective Florida with hurricanes and all that gets a respectable 1370 mm (in fantasy units it would be around 54 inches) per year, many countries with some 450 mm consider themselves to be "rainy".  The fact is that with suitable drainage and architectural adaptations this doesn't matter so much. As long as you truly aren't in a low laying area as in a valley, or such, but are at least a few meters (say 4 foots (1 m) or more) higher than the average ground level in your area, and have a high foundations, it shouldn't be such a big deal. Of course, low lying areas would need to evacuate.
2. Well this does seem like a problem. You would need a foundation of 1 meter or higher to feel somewhat safe and I do get that most people wouldn't invest in something like that.
3. Sorry, I don't see a hurricane blowing away or breaking a 12 inch (30 cm) ferroconcrete wall, much less something even stronger. Well may be if it were to lift a ship, or a heavy hauler truck and throw it against your wall, yes, that could do it, but it's not very likely either and you could make stronger columns at regular intervals on your external wall to guard somewhat against such events.
4. Roof doesn't need to be made of tiles, or such. My next house CERTAINLY wont' have any such roof, but rather a ferroconcrete platform some 8-10 inches (20-25 cm) thick.  Not because of hurricanes, but for security and practicality purposes. This allows for an additional easily usable surface, no serious maintenance requirements, etc.  If I wanted some solar panels up there - easy. An additional water tank? No problem. Rooftop garden - you are welcome! 3dsmile  I'm tired of traditional roofs and all related problems.
Water getting inside your home, well it all depends on where you built it, if you used sufficiently high foundations, etc. Also, it's quite possible to have a hermetic or almost hermetic house, most cold climates actually almost demand it for passive house purposes (they have active ventilation with heat recuperators systems), so it's not a far fetched thing to do. Of course, the glasses in your windows should also be adequately strong. Still, these measures ARE somewhat more expensive. Easier to just bring in some rocks and earth, rise the ground level where you are going to build your home, and simply build higher. Of course this is only financially viable if you are building anew and you have at least 1/10 of a hectare of land to work on and building code allowed you to do stuff like that in your locality. But when building anew you may actually buy the land where that's allowed. Or simply choose a more elevated location.

5. 2 meters of water, well yes, that could be a problem beyond somewhat reasonable means. If I were forced to live in such a location I would do some earth work before building my home, or at least would choose my location so that flooding over 1 meter (4 feet) would be unlikely (this height is reasonably solvable with higher foundations). As for starving to death, giving the ample warning time it's easy to get supplies for a few months. Water, I wouldn't live anywhere without my own well. Power, well I don't have them right now, but on my next house I'm planning to be fully of the grid, with solar, or microhydro power. Still I admit this IS expensive if you are already on the grid (as in an additional investment). It's not quite as expensive if you are building anew anyway. As for your car, everything depends on the measures you take to protect yourself. It's easy to have your car on a higher location, or even in a garage inside your already safe home. Still, all additional measures do have a cost, so after a point I do get and admit your point.

6.  Well they did, and I'm certain it shouldn't have costed so much. Ferroconcrete was already invented and having a concrete roof also wasn't ridiculously expensive as cement was much cheaper back then (in relative terms even after compensating for inflation). It seems strange to me that taking all those additional safety antihurricane measures for a regular roof seems cheaper to people than just pouring a concrete platform as your roof (of course you can't do that if your walls aren't strong enough). Could be, but concrete platform as a roof seems a pretty straightforward if somewhat brute force method to become mostly hurricane proof (if you put in some stronger external windows and doors too).

7. Ok, I can't argue with this argument. Historic circumstances are the way they are.

8. Good. Sad to say, that all of that and more will be needed to rebuild.

9. Probably, but it's difficult to evacuate and preserve all the stuff that you consider important. Photos (as in physical photos) you can bring with you, but books? My own home library has a thousand books or more. Water would simply destroy them if I were to live in a flood prone area or home. Some of those books although not expensive by any means are virtually irreplaceable, as they are thirty or more years out of print. Same with countless other stuff you can't actually bring with yourself in an evacuation.

10. Well that's a valid question too, still even when living in dangerous conditions almost in all cases you can take measures against them. BTW for a short time I considered moving to Hawaii, but after reading that not only lava flows may destroy your home, but government will actually evict you from your home if some lava flow passed nearby (without affecting your home) and would actually expropiate your home and land without any compensation too, I decided that the place certainly isn't for me.  3dsmile  As for the rest of your argument, I do agree with most of it.

11. That's the reason buildings and even infrastructure should be adapted, but the way I see it that's not the biggest problem for Florida. If it's truly as you say most of the state being less than a couple meters over sea level (on google Earth very few places in Florida are over 16 meters, and I couldn't find any place over 45 m), you are in for great problems in the next 100 years. As in quite probably going undersea. In your place I would sell your home while it's still worth something and look to move someplace more secure. Of course may be the governments of the world will actually act even when it becomes almost too late, launching terribly expensive projects like some solar shade or similar objects to reduce the amount of solar energy the Earth receives and compensate for the greenhouse gasses caused global warming, etc. But those are huge and very expensive geoengineering projects. Who knows what people in power will actually  decide. It won't depend much on me.  I only can change what measures I'll personally take to ensure the safety and well being of myself and my own family), so I'm already looking in at that. I don't consider myself a prepper as such, but in this case if one has the possibility, I couldn't respect myself if I as a parent didn't take every means at my disposal to prepare for some of the great problems that are very likely to happen inside my own lifetime (that's without even thinking about the lifetime of my children).



As for your name, the way things are going on in many countries, particularly in the USA after Harvey and Irma it could be considered a trigger word and its usage not exactly hate speech, but equivalent as in prosecutable by law. 3dsmile  Please people, don't let the USA keep devolving and destroying itself with excessive PC. 3dsmile

Last edited by Augur (2017-09-08 00:11:03)

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#13 2017-09-08 02:50:41

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Concrete homes are becoming more popular in the US.  However, I think flat roofs are a violation of code in most places.  (Perhaps there is an exception for concrete, I don't know)  People tend to be traditionalists, and concrete is not what we think of when we want to build a house.  I will say that most people in the US would think a house with a flat roof would look unappealing.  Adobe construction hasn't exactly swept the nation: it is only popular in the southwest.  (I mention it because it's the only common style of construction I know of with a flat roof)

As to them being able to do it in a cost-efficient way 60 years ago, I highly doubt it.  The forming of concrete back then was a very laborious process.  The only thing that really makes it economically viable now is the advent of ICF.  (Insulated Concrete Form, for those unaware).  Since ICF is designed specifically to be a quick process, and is left in place when finished, it makes the whole job less labor-intensive... but that sort of thing wasn't available when my house was constructed.

I think I should also point out that the houses in this area do not have "foundations", as you would consider them.  This house sits on a 4" slab of concrete.  That's it.  The floor of my house is terrazzo, which is marble chips embedded in concrete.  It is actually part of the slab.  There aren't any "foundation walls", no basement or crawlspace, no pilings, piers, or footings.  Just a slab sitting on the ground.

Were I forced to rebuild, the code requires that my home be raised above the base flood elevation.  The recommended method for doing that is to put the house on concrete piers.  The second method is to simply make a two story home, the bottom floor of which is not living space.  (Yes, this actually qualifies)

None of this matters, however.  I hate this fucking state.  If we ever pay off this house (whether through hurricane insurance payment or the old-fashioned way), we'll be moving out of Florida as fast as we can.  The weather here, as recently proves, SUCKS.

Eric Storm


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#14 2017-09-08 05:09:13

Barbarian3165
Wasted
Registered: 2015-02-11
Posts: 242

Re: Possible site administrator outage

And the alligators bite 3dwink

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#15 2017-09-08 05:15:20

fathertyme
Inebriated
From: Second star to the right
Registered: 2009-02-18
Posts: 84

Re: Possible site administrator outage

The phrase I read somewhere; which made sense to me about building things is: Speed, Quality, and Cost. Pick two.

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#16 2017-09-08 08:03:21

Augur
Inebriated
Registered: 2012-08-23
Posts: 82

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Agreed Eric. Still wouldn't you be ahead if you actually sold your house and used part of the money to pay off your debt? Wouldn't it leave you enough money to go live to a safer, cooler state with lower real estate prices? (being as Florida is still a rather expensive state). I don't know, something like Nebraska, Missouri, Wyoming, one of the Dakotas or any other of the central/north states? Particularly if you don't need a big city to live in, but rather choose some of the rural/semirural properties? A 10 min. search has allowed me to find properties with a house and some land from 60 thousand $ up.  Of course there are probably "buts" for that idea (like simple moving expenses and such), otherwise you probably would have done it being you hate Florida and all that. But if it's not prying to much, what state and location would you prefer to move to if you had the resources to do so?

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#17 2017-09-08 14:00:52

Freon22
Wasted
Registered: 2011-08-17
Posts: 121

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Hey Eric I am with you I have been waiting to see where Irma is going. I live right off of US19 and the traffic has been bumper to bumper heading north for the last three days. I am thinking I will more then likely leave tomorrow and head to Mississippi I was just going to go up into the panhandle but the track don't look to good for that. This is why you are right you have to know where it is going before you know where to go. I live in a mobile home so I will be going somewhere. Take Care and be Safe.


Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power.

― Abraham Lincoln

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#18 2017-09-08 16:44:10

Barbarian3165
Wasted
Registered: 2015-02-11
Posts: 242

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Pick two from speed, quality and cost is also a manufacturing rule.  Pretty much if you are making something that rule applies.

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#19 2017-09-08 18:17:09

hawkeye91000
Inebriated
Registered: 2009-09-12
Posts: 11

Re: Possible site administrator outage

stay safe eric

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#20 2017-09-08 18:30:35

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Re: Possible site administrator outage

As you can see, several of our regulars are in the same boat I am.

Our plans right now are to leave tomorrow evening.  Why tomorrow evening?  Because that damned bitch is supposed to turn tomorrow afternoon, and when she does that, we'll all have a better sense of where she's going to go.  We will be preparing to leave today and early tomorrow (wash clothes, get van packed up, put up the hurricane shutters, etc.)  If it turns out that her track shifts back east, even marginally, we won't be going.  Right now, as it stands, we are on the very very edge of projected hurricane force winds.  What I mean by that is that, right now, Irma is producing >74mph winds about 50 miles to the west of storm center.  She will pass, according to the current projection, 50 miles east of us.  This house has already been through a Category 1 hurricane direct hit unscathed, so that would not worry me.  What concerns me is if the storm moves even a few miles further west, or, Guardians forbid, moves all the way west so it runs up the west coast.  In that case, we will definitely be saying sayonara to Florida for a week or so.

We'll be heading back to Clarksville (TN) if we go, as we have family there, so we'll have shelter, food, etc.  But no internet!  ARGHHH!!!!  (I *WILL* find a way to get Internet, if I have to buy a wireless card for my PC and use my phone as a hotspot!!!)

I will post a note on here before I tear down my computer, to let you know we're going.

Eric Storm

PS:  Augur, to answer your question about housing:  I owe more on my house than I could likely sell it for.  And I couldn't sell it for $60,000 unless the housing bubble came back with a vengeance.


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#21 2017-09-08 19:25:18

Augur
Inebriated
Registered: 2012-08-23
Posts: 82

Re: Possible site administrator outage

I see. Well, you are certainly between the sword and the wall in this. BTW you don´t need a wifi card for your pc in order to use your phone as a modem. You can do that simply by connecting your phone to your pc via USB and configuring your phone to give tethered internet to the pc. It´s not as if a wifi card were expensive or anything, but you don´t really need it to accomplish what you said  you want. Be safe!

Last edited by Augur (2017-09-08 19:25:50)

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#22 2017-09-09 14:29:09

Eric Storm
Pub Owner
From: New Port Richey, FL
Registered: 2006-09-12
Posts: 4044
Website

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Okay, folks.  The storm's track has shifted, it's looking to be a major hurricane when it reaches Tampa Bay...  And we're getting the fuck out of here.

As of now, until further notice, site administration is suspended.  I will be taking my usual daily backup of the site right now, but after that, until this is over with, I can't guarantee site integrity, so post things at your own risk.

Don't want to sound like a broken record, but if you were ever going to make a donation to us, now would be a really good time...

See you on the other side...
Eric Storm & Keeshaba


Please Remember:  The right to Freedom of Speech does not carry the proviso, "As long as it doesn't upset anyone."  The US Constitution does not grant you the right to not be offended.  If you don't like what someone's saying... IGNORE THEM.
----
AMEN! >>> Word Crimes

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#23 2017-09-09 17:05:22

fathertyme
Inebriated
From: Second star to the right
Registered: 2009-02-18
Posts: 84

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Good Luck and God Bless

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#24 2017-09-10 09:43:07

hawkeye91000
Inebriated
Registered: 2009-09-12
Posts: 11

Re: Possible site administrator outage

good luck Eric stay safe

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#25 2017-09-12 03:34:04

emstorm73
Tipsy
Registered: 2010-02-25
Posts: 2

Re: Possible site administrator outage

Sorry I didn't post something sooner, but I was sleep deprived yesterday, and I've been feeling sick today.

We arrived at Keeshaba's parents' house without incident.

Irma weakened significantly before reaching our area, so the house is likely fine.  Power, however, is out and likely to stay that way for several days.  We will remain here until power is restored and the roads are clear.

Eric Storm

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